She wishes she could “mask” this permanent pandemic fail.

A TikTok user was asked what the “dumbest” tattoo she’s ever gotten, and it turns out the ink that had a profound meaning to her before COVID-19 struck is something she now regrets.

“So I got this tattoo — I’ve wanted it for a couple of years — it basically means being, like, true to yourself and real and not pretending to be something you’re not,” TikTok user @wakaflockafloccar explained in a now-viral video.

The unfortunate tat, which she got in March just before the coronavirus swept the world, reads: “Courageous and radically, refuse to wear a mask.”

She ends the clip by giving a sarcastic two thumbs up, and commenting: “I could NOT have had worse timing. P.S. I’m not anti-mask I promise.”

The post, which has now been viewed nearly 1.5 million times, garnered plenty of critical comments, including one user who asked what she plans to do now that the inking makes her seem anti-mask.

“Are you going to get it removed? Do people think you’re an anti-masker? Are you embarrassed by it? I need to know,” asked the TikToker.

“I wore long sleeves all last year so no one would see it,” she answered.

This embarrassing tat isn’t the only one that has the internet with jaws dropped recently.

An Aussie woman who said she often struggles to remember her “right” from her “left” got an “L” and an “R” tatted on her thumbs so she’d never forget again.

The photo immediately went viral, garnering over 4,000 likes in less than 24 hours.



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Billie Eilish’s biggest fear is being a “Bad Guy” to her fans.

“I wanted to be the artist that I would want to be a fan of,” Eilish, 19, revealed on the “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert” Tuesday night. “The idea that somebody could meet me and have a bad experience makes me wanna jump off a cliff, like, seriously. I want everyone that I come in contact with to feel completely just the highest high that they could possibly feel.”

The alt-pop princess, whose documentary, “Billie Eilish: The World’s a Little Blurry” premieres on Apple TV+ Friday, also reflected on her year in quarantine after canceling her “Where Do We Go?” world tour after just three shows last March. 

“It felt, um, the same as it felt for everybody else. It was so weird,” said Eilish. “Like, none of the year went at all the way I thought [it would], and … I really think that’s for everyone, obviously. I think I’m just glad that I had the year before that to really have a moment.”

But the five-time Grammy winner found a silver lining on lockdown.

“The year sucked, and if I could go back and change it, I would, but at the same time, I’ve gotten more time off than I’ve ever ever ever ever had,” said Eilish. “And of course I think that goes for everyone. But that was true for me after two weeks of it. Two weeks already at the beginning of quarantine was the most time I had off in, like, four years.”

Eilish also found the creative space to make the much-anticipated follow-up to her debut album, 2019’s “When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?”

“I just don’t think I would have made the same album or even the album at all if it weren’t for COVID,” she said. “That doesn’t mean it’s, like, about COVID at all. It’s just that when things are different in your life, you’re different. It’s just how it is. I have to thank COVID for that — and that’s about it.”



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It’s a big step up from Forks, Washington.

“Twilight” star Kristen Stewart plunked down $6 million on a four-bedroom, five-and-a-half-bathroom home in Los Angeles earlier this month, according to Architectural Digest.

The 1927 Mediterranean revival house in the neighborhood Los Feliz has classic red-tiled roofing, arched doorways, lantern lighting and combination tile and oak wood floors.

Dark wooden ceiling beams and wrought-iron chandeliers contrast the ivory walls, according to the listing.

The 4,864-square-foot home has a living room with a dark tiled fireplace. It and the adjacent dining room have French doors that lead onto a covered porch.

Kristin Stewart's 1927 Mediterranean revival house has classic red tiled roofing, arched doorways, lantern lighting and combination tile and oak wood floors.
Kristen Stewart’s 1927 Mediterranean revival house has classic red tiled roofing, arched doorways, lantern lighting and combination tile and oak wood floors.
Realtor.com/Getty Images

But contrasting the house’s deep-brown palette, the home is dotted with red tile, filled with plants and outfitted with grayish-green trim.

The family room opens onto a set of stairs leading onto the 0.3-acre lot with tall palm trees.
The family room opens onto a set of stairs leading onto the 0.3-acre lot with tall palm trees.
realtor.com

Previous owners of the home include “ER” actor Anthony Edwards, according to LA property records.

The property also has an attached guest house that was converted from a garage into a dwelling with the same Mediterranean style
The property also has an attached guest house that was converted from a garage into a dwelling with the same Mediterranean style.
realtor.com

The “Charlie’s Angels” and “Twilight” alum also owns another home in Los Feliz, a $9.5 million home in Malibu and a $5.6 million apartment in New York City. 

The 30-year-old is set to play Princess Diana in Pablo Larraín’s “Spencer.” Her most recent release is Hulu’s Christmas rom-com “Happiest Season,” during the filming of which she allegedly got COVID-19, in February 2020.

The family room opens onto the 0.3-acre lot, with tall palm trees, a landscaped garden and a saline pool, which was added in 1996, according to LA property records.

The property also has an attached guest house that was converted from a garage into a dwelling with the same Mediterranean style, according to Sotheby’s.  

She was last known to be dating scriptwriter Dylan Meyer, and while it’s not clear if they live together, Stewart said she planned to marry Meyer back in 2019.
She was last known to be dating screenwriter Dylan Meyer, and while it’s not clear if they live together, Stewart said she planned to marry Meyer back in 2019.
realtor.com
The dining room also has french doors that lead onto a balcony.
The dining room also has French doors that lead onto the porch.
realtor.com

The kitchen makes plentiful use of this pop of color, with green cabinetry surrounding the double oven, double burner, double refrigerator and black kitchen island.

The kitchen has a double oven, double burner, double refrigerator and a black kitchen island.
The kitchen has a double oven, double burner, double refrigerator and a kitchen island.
realtor.com
The kitchen makes plentiful use of this pop of color with green cabinetry.
The kitchen makes plentiful use of a contrasting pop of color, with green cabinetry throughout.
realtor.com

Stewart’s bedroom suite has white ceiling beams, arched bookcases built into the walls and a sunny sitting room. French doors lead to a balcony — plus, the suite has two walk-in closets and a pale-blue-tiled bathroom. 

She was last known to be dating screenwriter Dylan Meyer, and while it’s not clear if they live together, Stewart said in 2019 that she plans to marry her. 

French doors lead onto a balcony.
French doors lead onto a balcony.
realtor.com
The owner’s suite has inset arched bookcases built into the walls and a sitting room with white ceiling beams.
The owner’s suite has inset bookcases and a sitting room with white ceiling beams.
realtor.com
French doors lead to a covered porch donned with a pop of greyish-green.
French doors lead to a covered porch donned with a pop of grayish-green.
realtor.com

Sotheby’s International Realty broker Richard Yohon and Konstantine Valissarakos of Nourmand & Associates had the listing.

The Charlie’s Angels and Twilight alum also owns another home in Los Feliz, a $9.5 million home in Malibu and a $5.6 million apartment in New York City.
The “Charlie’s Angels” and “Twilight” alum also owns another home in Los Feliz, a $9.5 million home in Malibu and a $5.6 million apartment in New York City.
realtor.com



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SAN FRANCISCO — Lawrence Ferlinghetti, the poet, publisher, bookseller and activist who helped launch the Beat movement in the 1950s and embodied its curious and rebellious spirit well into the 21st century, has died at age 101. 

Ferlinghetti, a San Francisco institution, died Monday at his home, his son Lorenzo Ferlinghetti said. A month shy of his 102nd birthday, Ferlinghetti died “in his own room,” holding the hands of his son and his son’s girlfriend, “as he took his last breath.” The cause of death was lung disease. Ferlinghetti had received the first dose of the COVID vaccine last week, his son said Tuesday.

Few poets of the past 60 years were so well known, or so influential. His books sold more than 1 million copies worldwide, a fantasy for virtually any of his peers, and he ran one of the world’s most famous and distinctive bookstores, City Lights. Although he never considered himself one of the Beats, he was a patron and soul mate and, for many, a lasting symbol — preaching a nobler and more ecstatic American dream.

“Am I the consciousness of a generation or just some old fool sounding off and trying to escape the dominant materialist avaricious consciousness of America?” he asked in “Little Boy,” a stream of consciousness novel published around the time of his 100th birthday

He made history. Through the City Lights publishing arm, books by Jack Kerouac, William S. Burroughs and many others came out and the release of Allen Ginsberg’s landmark poem “Howl” led to a 1957 obscenity case that broke new ground for freedom of expression. 

He also defied history. The Internet, superstore chains and high rents shut down numerous booksellers in the Bay Area and beyond, but City Lights remained a thriving political and cultural outlet, where one section was devoted to books enabling “revolutionary competence,” where employees could get the day off to attend an anti-war protest. 

“Generally, people seem to get more conservative as they age, but in my case, I seem to have gotten more radical,” Ferlinghetti told Interview magazine in 2013. “Poetry must be capable of answering the challenge of apocalyptic times, even if this means sounding apocalyptic.”

The store even endured during the coronavirus outbreak, when it was forced to close and required $300,000 to stay in business. A GoFundMe campaign quickly raised $400,000.

Ferlinghetti, tall and bearded, with sharp blue eyes, could be soft-spoken, even introverted and reticent in unfamiliar situations. But he was the most public of poets and his work wasn’t intended for solitary contemplation. It was meant to be recited or chanted out loud, whether in coffee houses, bookstores or at campus gatherings.

His 1958 compilation, “A Coney Island of the Mind,” sold hundreds of thousands of copies in the U.S. alone. Long an outsider from the poetry community, Ferlinghetti once joked that he had “committed the sin of too much clarity.” He called his style “wide open” and his work, influenced in part by e.e. cummings, was often lyrical and childlike: “Peacocks walked/under the night trees/in the lost moon/light/when I went out/looking for love,” he wrote in “Coney Island.”

Ferlinghetti also was a playwright, novelist, translator and painter and had many admirers among musicians. In 1976, he recited “The Lord’s Prayer” at the Band’s farewell concert, immortalized in Martin Scorsese’s “The Last Waltz.” The folk-rock band Aztec Two-Step lifted its name from a line in the title poem of Ferlinghetti’s “Coney Island” book: “A couple of Papish cats/is doing an Aztec two-step.” Ferlinghetti also published some of the earliest film reviews by Pauline Kael, who with The New Yorker became one of the country’s most influential critics.

He lived long and well despite a traumatic childhood. His father died five months before Lawrence was born in Yonkers, New York, in 1919, leaving behind a sense of loss that haunted him, yet provided much of the creative tension that drove his art. His mother, unable to cope, had a nervous breakdown two years after his father’s death. She eventually disappeared and died in a state hospital.

Ferlinghetti spent years moving among relatives, boarding homes and an orphanage before he was taken in by a wealthy New York family, the Bislands, for whom his mother had worked as a governess. He studied journalism at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, received a master’s in literature from Columbia University, and a doctorate degree from the Sorbonne in Paris. His early influences included Ernest Hemingway, Thomas Wolfe and Ezra Pound.

Ferlinghetti hated war, because he was in one. In 1945, he was a Navy commander stationed in Japan and remembered visiting Nagasaki a few weeks after the U.S. had dropped an atom bomb. The carnage, he would recall, made him an “instant pacifist.” 

Ferlinghetti, a San Francisco institution, died Monday at his home
Few poets of the past 60 years were so well known, or so influential as Ferlinghetti.
AP

In the early 1950s, he settled in San Francisco and married Selden Kirby-Smith, whom he divorced in 1976. (They had two children). Ferlinghetti also became a member of the city’s rising literary movement, the so-called San Francisco Renaissance, and soon helped establish a gathering place. Peter D, Martin, a sociologist, had opened a paperback store in the city’s North Beach section and named it after a recent Charlie Chaplin film, “City Lights.” When Ferlinghetti saw the storefront, in 1953, he suggested he and Martin become partners. Each contributed $500.

Ferlinghetti later told The New York Times: “City Lights became about the only place around where you could go in, sit down, and read books without being pestered to buy something.”

The Beats, who had met in New York in the 1940s, now had a new base. One project was City Lights’ Pocket Poets series, which offered low-cost editions of verse, notably Ginsberg’s “Howl.” Ferlinghetti had heard Ginsberg read a version in 1955 and wrote him: “I greet you at the beginning of a great career. When do I get the manuscript?” a humorous take on the message sent from Ralph Waldo Emerson to Walt Whitman upon reading “Leaves of Grass.”

Ferlinghetti published “Howl and Other Poems” in 1956, but customs officials seized copies of the book that were being shipped from London, and Ferlinghetti was arrested on obscenity charges. After a highly publicized court battle, a judge in 1957 ruled that “Howl” was not obscene, despite its sexual themes, citing the poem’s relevance as a criticism of modern society. A 2010 film about the case, “Howl,” starred James Franco as Ginsberg and Andrew Rogers as Ferlinghetti.

Ferlinghetti would also release Kerouac’s “Book of Dreams,” prison writings by Timothy Leary and Frank O’Hara’s “Lunch Poems.” Ferlinghetti risked prison for “Howl,” but rejected Burrough’s classic “Naked Lunch,” worrying that publication would lead to “sure premeditated legal lunacy.”

Ferlinghetti’s eyesight was poor in recent years, but he continued to write and to keep regular hours at City Lights. The establishment, meanwhile, warmed to him, even if the affection wasn’t always returned. He was named San Francisco’s first poet laureate, in 1998, and City Lights was granted landmark status three years later. He received an honorary prize from the National Book Critics Circle in 2000 and five years later was given a National Book Award medal for “his tireless work on behalf of poets and the entire literary community.” 

“The dominant American mercantile culture may globalize the world, but it is not the mainstream culture of our civilization,” Ferlinghetti said upon receiving the award. “The true mainstream is made, not of oil, but of literarians, publishers, bookstores, editors, libraries, writers and readers, universities and all the institutions that support them.”

In 2012, Ferlinghetti won the Janus Pannonius International Poetry Prize from the Hungarian PEN Club. When he learned the country’s right-wing government was a sponsor, he turned the award down.



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Could this explain some of this year’s egregious snubs?

The Hollywood Foreign Press Association — the group of people who nominate and select winners for the annual Golden Globes — has come under fire for lack of diversity after a report found zero black members currently in the organization.

The Los Angeles Times did a bombshell deep dive into the “insular, improbably powerful group” and the mysterious identities of its 87 members, who often keep “low profiles.” The revealing report found that although the group has some members of color — there are no black members.

The HFPA confirmed to the outlet that there are indeed no black members — but claimed it’s an issue they’re “committed to addressing.” However, the group did not elaborate on a plan of action.

When nominations were released in early February, there were notable snubs including widely acclaimed films such as Spike Lee’s “Da 5 Bloods” and Shaka King’s “Judas and the Black Messiah” for the top big screen honors. Same goes for the entire cast of HBO’s “Lovecraft Country” on the small screen: It was nominated for best TV drama — but the entire cast was overlooked for acting nods.

Similar omissions have previously led to mass outcries from the public, namely in 2015 when the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, which hands out Oscars, was criticized for lack of diversity. The #OscarsSoWhite social-media campaign forced the organization to make moves for more inclusivity, which it has since been working to address.

Norm Lewis, Delroy Lindo, Clarke Peters and Jonathan Majors in a scene from "Da 5 Bloods."
Isiah Whitlock (far left), Norm Lewis, Delroy Lindo, Clarke Peters and Jonathan Majors in a scene from Spike Lee’s acclaimed — and snubbed — “Da 5 Bloods.”
Netflix

However, the HFPA pointed fingers at the group’s members for failing to nominate the critically acclaimed — and fan-adored — projects.

“We do not control the individual votes of our members,” HFPA said in a statement to the LA Times. “We seek to build cultural understanding through film and TV and recognize how the power of creative storytelling can educate people around the world to issues of race, representation and orientation.”

As for the true identities of the elusive group, the folks involved are not publicly listed on the association’s website. A “longtime publicist” told the outlet that some are international journalists, but “a lot of them work with outlets I’ve never heard of.”

Still, the rep said: “We give them amazing access. We are forced to do that because of who they are.”

Still, some are well-known, including Lisa Lu, who played the grandmother in 2018’s “Crazy Rich Asians.” Other members include former beauty queen Margaret Gardiner, former Russian bodybuilder Alexander Nevsky, who is now an actor with roles in “low-budget action films,” and Noel de Souza, a journalist from India who also played Mahatma Gandhi in a “Star Trek: Voyager” episode.

The Golden Globes group’s lack of diversity isn’t the only controversy brewing behind-the-scenes ahead of the show, which is set to air Feb. 28.

Another explosive report claimed that the HFPA was treated to a five-star trip to France to visit the set of “Emily in Paris,” which scored a nomination that many critics and fans considered to be a shock. Even a writer for the Netflix show penned a piece stating that other great works, including “I May Destroy You,” instead deserved the nomination.



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With a crust that leavens for 96 hours, flour imported from Italy and a distinctive rectangular shape, this pizza is a cut above what’s available at your local slice joint.

But you can’t get a reservation to try it — or even order a pie for takeout.

NYC’s most exclusive, sought-after pies are only available via barter. Hopefuls trying to score a small-batch pie have to sign up online, and if they’re chosen, trade their own offering of food or drink.

Gabriele Lamonaca, 30, gets five to 10 requests for his Roman-style pies every day through his site, UnregularPizza.com, but only has enough capacity in his Harlem apartment’s kitchen to turn out three or four per week.

“It’s heartbreaking not to be able to provide as many pizzas as people want,” he told The Post. “I put a lot of effort into each pizza, and I never repeat [the flavor combinations].”

Gabriele Lamonaca meets with Ava King to trade pizza and baked ziti.
Pizza maker Gabriele Lamonaca offers bespoke pies via social media. They don’t cost any dough, but customers have to bring their own dishes to trade. Ava King (above) swapped a baked ziti for one.
Brian Zak/NY Post

He meets customers who find him through his Instagram account in the streets to trade his creations for their own signature dishes or bottles of wine.

The Rome native came to New York in 2008 to study chemistry at St. Francis College in Brooklyn Heights and learn English, but said he was always drawn to restaurants and had the goal of opening his own place. In 2017, he took a job managing the line at a Brooklyn Chipotle. “I really wanted to understand how Americans use their lunch hour,” he said. Since then, he’s worked for Cacio e Vino in the East Village, various Italian food distributors and Filaga, a pizza shop in Chelsea Market.

Lamonaca — who’s hoping to open his own restaurant this coming spring — started experimenting with recipes in earnest when COVID-19 hit and work in the restaurant industry dried up. 

He brings his science chops to his kitchen in Harlem, which he shares with his filmmaker girlfriend, turning out pizza with dough that leavens for three days. “The longer it’s leavened, the lighter the dough and the crunchier the crust,” said Lamonaca, who then tops his pies with favorites such as burrata cheese, zucchini, anchovies, cold cuts and, for a Super Bowl pie, fried chicken. 

His flour is imported from Italy, and he buys local, organic produce, often from Union Square Market. He estimates that each pie costs $25 to produce. 

Friends began requesting pies for themselves, jealous of the mouthwatering pics Lamonaca posts. Not wanting to take cash from them, he devised a different type of transaction. “I really wanted them to try it, and I figured everyone was cooking in their homes, so I told them to give me whatever they were making in return.”

Gabriele Lamonaca’s flour is imported from Italy, and he buys local, organic produce, often from Union Square Market.
Gabriele Lamonaca’s flour is imported from Italy, and he buys local, organic produce, often from Union Square Market.
Courtesy of Gabriele Lamonaca

He said there’s some historical precedent for bartering. During leaner times in post-World War II Italy, “My grandmother would bake bread and press olives into oil, and trade it to neighbors for eggs,” he said. 

In modern-day NYC, trades include everything from chocolate cake to chicken Milanese to the fermented tea called kombucha. 

“I brew my own, so I bartered half a gallon for a pizza,” Christina Nee, 23, of Prospect Heights, told The Post of her December barter. She passed off a bottle of her DIY drink to Lamonaca in Union Square Park, then scarfed down his pesto pizza on a nearby bench with her boyfriend.

Pizza maker Gabriele Lamonaca receives a heart-shaped crostata from Kiari de Paola.
Trades with Gabriele Lamonaca include everything from chocolate cake to chicken Milanese to kombucha. Here, he receives a heart-shaped crostata from Kiari de Paola (center). 
Courtesy of Gabriele Lamonaca

“It was the best pizza I have ever had,” she said. “I went to Italy last year, and the pesto was so good. This tasted exactly like it.” 

Thirty-five-year-old Kiari de Paola, who is Italian herself, was also chasing that genuine flavor when she connected with Lamonaca through social media. For her barter, she whipped up an Italian dessert known as a crostata, in the shape of a heart for Valentine’s Day. The pair met in the Meatpacking District for the trade, where she scored a burrata pie with sliced zucchini and a red-cabbage sauce that she said reminded her of home.

“I will definitely want to try more of his pizza,” said the Astoria resident and food blogger, who leads local tours through her travel agency New York City 4 All. “Not only because it was delicious, but because it’s authentic Italian.”

Lamonaca said the trades are “exciting,” and added, “You never know what you’re going to get in the barter.” But fans are hoping for the day where they won’t have to whip up a dish of their own to get a taste of his pizza.

“When Gabriele opens his shop, we’ll be there on opening night,” said Nee. 





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“Home Improvement” actor Zachery Ty Bryan cut a plea deal Tuesday to avoid jail time in the “choking” attack on his girlfriend in Oregon last year, according to reports.

The 39-year-old actor pleaded guilty to misdemeanor counts of menacing and fourth-degree assault in exchange for three years of probation in the Oct. 16, 2020, attack on his girlfriend in his Eugene apartment, KEZI-TV said Tuesday.

Prosecutors agreed to drop six other charges — which included strangulation and coercion — against Bryan, the station said.

Zachery Ty Bryan at an event on November 13, 2016.
Zachery Ty Bryan at an event on November 13, 2016.
Photo by Paul Archuleta/FilmMagic

The actor also agreed not to contact the victim.

Police said officers arriving at the apartment complex after the incident found Bryan sitting outside and his girlfriend reportedly hiding in a friend’s apartment.

Bryan was arrested and released on $8,500 bail the following day.

According to police documents obtained by TMZ at the time, the actor’s girlfriend told police he woke, pulled her by her hair and started beating her while shouting obscenities — and choked her to the point that she feared she would suffocate.

Bryan is best known for his role of Brad Taylor in the hit 1990’s TV comedy, and has since become a television producer.



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Series veterans Katherine Heigl and Sarah Chalke team up for the first time on the small screen in “Firefly Lane,” based on Kristin Hannah’s 2008 novel.

The 10-episode Netflix drama, adapted for the small screen by Maggie Friedman, pinball-pings between the ’70s, ’80s and 2003 and will appeal to fans of earnest, tug-at-your-heartstrings drama finessed by two familiar TV faces.

The storyline is woven around BFFs Tully Hart (Heigl) and Kate Mularkey (Chalke), who meet as teens in the mid-’70s when Tully (Ali Skovbye) moves to the show’s titular street with her hippie/druggy irresponsible single mom Cloud (Beau Garrett), who’s constantly stoned and oblivious to her daughter’s needs.

Tully’s tough exterior masks a deeper, sensitive side, while bookish Kate (Roan Curtis) — who wears cruelly ginormous glasses — lives across the street with her standard-issue square parents (Chelah Horsdal, Paul McGillion) and her secretly gay older brother, Sean (played younger by Quinn Lord and older Josh Mckinnon).

Kate is a good-natured soul, a socially awkward outsider who is, by turns, repelled by and gravitationally drawn to Tully, who exposes her to a side of life she could only heretofore imagine. They become fast friends, bonding over their markedly different home lives, a tragic secret and a shared love of small-town adventure and escapism.

Katherine Heigl and Sarah Chalke team up for the first time on the small screen in "Firefly Lane,"  based on Kristin Hannah's 2008 novel.
Katherine Heigl and Sarah Chalke team up for the first time on the small screen in “Firefly Lane.”
COURTESY OF NETFLIX

As the series unwinds, we track the arc of Tully and Kate’s friendship, which endures through high school and beyond as they room together in college and enter the workplace. At this point, Heigl and Chalke take over and continue in the Tully/Kate roles as the years progress. Life will throw them both curveballs in their romantic, professional and personal lives. Kate marries and has a daughter (Yael Yurman); Tully, determined to become a trailblazing TV anchor in Seattle, eventually lives the dream in that be-careful what-you-wish-for kind of way. Ben Lawson plays their romantic lightning-rod, Johnny Ryan, an Australian former war correspondent (with requisite stubble and pearly whites) who’s reduced to producing a softball local news program — and is not happy about it.

I can’t say how closely the characters and situations in “Firefly Lane” adhere to Hannah’s novel (she’s a co-executive producer). The series is entertaining enough in that angst-y kind of way, with solid performances all around, particularly from Skovbye and Curtis as the younger Tully and Kate. They’re very believable as odd-couple opposites who appreciate what they find in each other, and their performances are complemented by a nice on-screen chemistry.

"Firefly Lane" is based on Kristin Hannah's 2008 novel.
“Firefly Lane” is based on Kristin Hannah’s 2008 novel.
COURTESY OF NETFLIX

Heigl and Chalke, with long track records in network drama, inherit the best-friends mantle and seesaw back-and-forth between their 20s and 40s alter-egos with aplomb, revealing the depths of their characters’ triumphs and tribulations. (Kudos to the show’s six-person makeup team, costume designer Allisa Swanson and art director Kristina Lyne).

I wouldn’t call the series binge-y in that “gotta see the next episode — now!” kind of way. It does get a bit repetitious at times, and its decades-jumping plotline, often within a single continuous scene, can be jarring and confusing (wait, what year is that?)

But if you’re looking for an interesting place to visit, a stroll down “Firefly Lane” will do the trick.



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Bad meets beetle in DC Comics’ upcoming flick based on the “Blue Beetle” series.

The new project will see Warner Bros. and DC Films’ first Latino superhero character come to life on the big screen, insiders have confirmed to the Wrap.

The story’s spotlight is on Mexican-American teenager Jaime Reyes — one of three different characters in the comic series to assume the Blue Beetle alter ego, although the film will focus only on Reyes.

Warner Bros. has signed on Angel Manuel Soto — director of HBO Max’s “Charm City Kings” — to helm “Blue Beetle,” featuring a screenplay by Mexican-born Gareth Dunnet-Alcocer, writer of the 2019 crime-thriller “Miss Bala” and Universal’s forthcoming “Scarface” remake. The groundbreaking film is scheduled to start shooting in the fall of this year.

"Charm City Kings" director Angel Manuel Soto will lead the project to bring DC Comics' first Latino superhero character to life on the big screen.
“Charm City Kings” director Angel Manuel Soto will lead the project to bring DC Comics’ first Latino superhero character to life on the big screen.
Getty Images

The defunct Fox Comics created Blue Beetle in 1939, as the superhero identity of fictional police officer Dan Garrett, who developed extrasensory powers after downing experimental supplements. The series was later bought by another now-shuttered publisher, Charlton Comics, where the mutant cop was reimagined as an archaeologist instead; later still, he morphed into an inventor named Ted Kord.

DC Comics ultimately acquired Blue Beetle in the 1980s and, in 2006, re-introduced the character in his current iteration as working-class protagonist Jaime Reyes, from El Paso, Texas, whose family has no ties to superhumans. Reyes is said to have discovered a supernatural scarab while walking home from school. At home, the beetle escapes its capsule and fuses itself to the unwitting teen.

In a statement to the Wrap, Soto said, “It is an honor to direct ‘Blue Beetle,’ the first Latino superhero film for DC.”

“I want to sincerely thank everyone at Warner Bros. and DC for trusting me to bring Jaime Reyes to life. I can’t wait to make history together,” the filmmaker added.



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